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Alan Shearer Simply Cannot Be The Messiah for Newcastle Now

Newcastle fans love him. Mike Ashley arguably had no choice but to turn to him. After relegation, however, Alan Shearer simply cannot be the answer to Newcastle’s Championship challenge… 

Shearer: Did what he could with what he had, but Newcastle need more.

Shearer: Did what he could with what he had, but Newcastle need more.

Can you blame Alan Shearer?

Can you blame Joe Kinnear?

Can you blame Mike Ashley?

In the wake of Newcastle United’s devastating relegation on Sunday, fingers will be undoubtedly be pointed. Blame will have to be attributed.

As interim manager, Alan Shearer doesn’t believe one single individual is to blame. “Over 38 games, we all have not been good enough,” he said, in the wake of the club’s 1-0 defeat at Aston Villa.

But, having gained an average of 0.63 points per game from his eight games in charge (a statistic that would have amounted to 24 points over the full course of the season), he cannot — however much it might pain Newcastle fans — be absolved from all blame.

Mike Ashley, as chairman and bumbler-in-chief over the past season, will have to take the majority of the blame, and deservedly so. His mismanagement saw Kevin Keegan leave the club in acrimonious circumstances, and the difficult position that left him in forced his hand somewhat when it came to a replacement.

Joe Kinnear did well, if unspectacularly. But when he fell ill, the fat lady began singing.

Alan Shearer is a club legend — and deservedly so — but five points from eight games is simply not good enough. The challenge now is to take the club out of the Championship at the first time of asking, and that is a task that requires not just basic managerial skills — which Shearer clearly does not yet possess — but also specific motivational and tactical skills.

Most importantly, it requires experience.

Many players will leave, and many new players will have to come in. Does anyone really expect Shearer to be able to identify those players that a) are good enough to get play the club out of the Championship, and b) are willing to play in that league?

Shearer has not yet proven himself good enough for the Premiership, a league he has extremely intimate knowledge of. Having never played in the Championship, it would be ridiculous to suggest that he is the best man for the uphill task the club face.

Iain Dowie, Shearer’s assistant, may have earned promotion with Crystal Palace in 2004 — but that was via the playoffs (where luck is the most valuable commodity) and with an inherited team already capable of such an effort.

Newcastle need a proven commodity to take the team on.

They do not have that at the moment. But there are some options out there.

Steve Coppell, for example, could be the man.

The former Manchester United winger has a decent record of winning promotion with many of his clubs, and has an intimate, recent, and successful knowledge of the second tier of English football. He also knows how to take a club up and then keep them up — in 2007 his newly promoted Reading side finished eighth in the Premiership (a finish Newcastle have since failed to equal).

He has the pedigree for the task and, more importantly, is currently unemployed. Ashley would not have to step on any toes to get him. The only question is whether Coppell would desire the challenge of managing such a massive club — after all, in 1996 he left Manchester City after just 33 days, citing the pressure of expectations as a reason for his departure.

If the former England international shows interest in the job, Ashley should not hesitate in holding talks.

But if Coppell does not want the challenge, then there are other options.

Gordon Strachan, fresh from resignation at Celtic, might be persuaded to take the manager’s job if he can be given guarantees on transfer budgets and long-term ambitions. Of course, he might end up at arch-rivals (and Premiership survivors) Sunderland, instead. The lure of the Premiership might prove the decisive factor in the Scot’s decisions.

If that happens, it should be just the dose of realism the club’s directors and fans need.

The betting exchanges currently list Slaven Bilic, Avram Grant, Gerard Houllier, and Mark Hughes among the favourites for the job. Not one of them has Championship experience as a manager.

Coppell, Tony Mowbray, Alan Curbishley — all have experience of the Championship. Even Neil Warnock knows how to get a club out of the Championship. These should be the names given serious consideration.

Newcastle fans might not like the names mentioned above, believing them not to be worthy or glamorous enough for such a prestigious jobs, but that is exactly why so many fans at other Premiership clubs seem to have taken pleasure in their unfortunate plight.

Banners at Villa Park, from “Sob on the Tyne” to “Who Is You Next Messiah, Ant or Dec?” harshly mocked the devout followers of Newcastle United. Rightly or wrongly, this is down to the narrow-minded “holier than thou” attitude the Toon Army are perceived to have.

Thinking Alan Shearer is still the answer to their problems would only add further evidence to that perception.

If Newcastle want to get out of the Championship at the first time of asking, a man with Championship success on his CV needs to be in charge.

Mike Ashley needs to be strong enough to make such an appointment. Newcastle fans need to be realistic and humble enough to let him.

It would not be a criticism of Shearer.

It would simply be the best thing for the football club.

 

 

Can you blame Alan Shearer?
Can you blame Joe Kinnear?
Can you blame Mike Ashley?
In the wake of Newcastle United’s devastating relegation on Sunday, fingers will be undoubtedly be pointed. Blame will have to be attributed.
As interim manager, Alan Shearer doesn’t believe one single individual is to blame. “Over 38 games, we all have not been good enough,” he said, in the wake of the club’s 1-0 defeat at Aston Villa.
But, having gained an average of 0.63 points per game from his eight games in charge (a statistic that would have amounted to 24 points over the full course of the season), he cannot—however much it might pain Newcastle fans—be absolved from all blame.
Mike Ashley, as chairman and bumbler-in-chief over the past season, will have to take the majority of the blame, and deservedly so. His mismanagement saw Kevin Keegan leave the club in acrimonious circumstances, and the difficult position that left him in forced his hand somewhat when it came to a replacement.
Joe Kinnear did well, if unspectacularly. But when he fell ill, the fat lady began singing.
Alan Shearer is a club legend—and deservedly so—but five points from eight games is simply not good enough. The challenge now is to take the club out of the Championship at the first time of asking, and that is a task that requires not just basic managerial skills—which Shearer clearly does not yet possess—but also specific motivational and tactical skills.
Most importantly, it requires experience.
Many players will leave, and many new players will have to come in. Does anyone really expect Shearer to be able to identify those players that a) are good enough to get play the club out of the Championship, and b) are willing to play in that league?
Shearer has not yet proven himself good enough for the Premiership, a league he has extremely intimate knowledge of. Having never played in the Championship, it would be ridiculous to suggest that he is the best man for the uphill task the club face.
Iain Dowie, Shearer’s assistant, may have earned promotion with Crystal Palace in 2004—but that was via the playoffs (where luck is the most valuable commodity) and with an inherited team already capable of such an effort.
Newcastle need a proven commodity to take the team on.
They do not have that at the moment. But there are some options out there.
Steve Coppell, for example, could be the man.
The former Manchester United winger has a decent record of winning promotion with many of his clubs, and has an intimate, recent, and successful knowledge of the second tier of English football. He also knows how to take a club up and then keep them up—in 2007 his newly promoted Reading side finished eighth in the Premiership (a finish Newcastle have since failed to equal).
He has the pedigree for the task and, more importantly, is currently unemployed. Ashley would not have to step on any toes to get him. The only question is whether Coppell would desire the challenge of managing such a massive club—after all, in 1996 he left Manchester City after just 33 days, citing the pressure of expectations as a reason for his departure.
If the former England international shows interest in the job, Ashley should not hesitate in holding talks.
But if Coppell does not want the challenge, then there are other options.
Gordon Strachan, fresh from resignation at Celtic, might be persuaded to take the manager’s job if he can be given guarantees on transfer budgets and long-term ambitions. Of course, he might end up at arch-rivals (and Premiership survivors) Sunderland, instead. The lure of the Premiership might prove the decisive factor in the Scot’s decisions.
If that happens, it should be just the dose of realism the club’s directors and fans need.
The betting exchanges currently list Slaven Bilic, Avram Grant, Gerard Houllier, and Mark Hughes among the favourites for the job. Not one of them has Championship experience as a manager.
Coppell, Tony Mowbray, Alan Curbishley—all have experience of the Championship. Even Neil Warnock knows how to get a club out of the Championship. These should be the names given serious consideration.
Newcastle fans might not like the names mentioned above, believing them not to be worthy or glamorous enough for such a prestigious jobs, but that is exactly why so many fans at other Premiership clubs seem to have taken pleasure in their unfortunate plight.
Banners at Villa Park, from “Sob on the Tyne” to “Who Is You Next Messiah, Ant or Dec?” harshly mocked the devout followers of Newcastle United. Rightly or wrongly, this is down to the narrow-minded “holier than thou” attitude the Toon Army are perceived to have.
Thinking Alan Shearer is still the answer to their problems would only add further evidence to that perception.
If Newcastle want to get out of the Championship at the first time of asking, a man with Championship success on his CV needs to be in charge.
Mike Ashley needs to be strong enough to make such an appointment. Newcastle fans need to be realistic and humble enough to let him.
It would not be a criticism of Shearer.
It would simply be the best thing for the football club.Can you blame Alan Shearer?

 

Can you blame Joe Kinnear?
Can you blame Mike Ashley?
In the wake of Newcastle United’s devastating relegation on Sunday, fingers will be undoubtedly be pointed. Blame will have to be attributed.
As interim manager, Alan Shearer doesn’t believe one single individual is to blame. “Over 38 games, we all have not been good enough,” he said, in the wake of the club’s 1-0 defeat at Aston Villa.
But, having gained an average of 0.63 points per game from his eight games in charge (a statistic that would have amounted to 24 points over the full course of the season), he cannot—however much it might pain Newcastle fans—be absolved from all blame.
Mike Ashley, as chairman and bumbler-in-chief over the past season, will have to take the majority of the blame, and deservedly so. His mismanagement saw Kevin Keegan leave the club in acrimonious circumstances, and the difficult position that left him in forced his hand somewhat when it came to a replacement.
Joe Kinnear did well, if unspectacularly. But when he fell ill, the fat lady began singing.
Alan Shearer is a club legend—and deservedly so—but five points from eight games is simply not good enough. The challenge now is to take the club out of the Championship at the first time of asking, and that is a task that requires not just basic managerial skills—which Shearer clearly does not yet possess—but also specific motivational and tactical skills.
Most importantly, it requires experience.
Many players will leave, and many new players will have to come in. Does anyone really expect Shearer to be able to identify those players that a) are good enough to get play the club out of the Championship, and b) are willing to play in that league?
Shearer has not yet proven himself good enough for the Premiership, a league he has extremely intimate knowledge of. Having never played in the Championship, it would be ridiculous to suggest that he is the best man for the uphill task the club face.
Iain Dowie, Shearer’s assistant, may have earned promotion with Crystal Palace in 2004—but that was via the playoffs (where luck is the most valuable commodity) and with an inherited team already capable of such an effort.
Newcastle need a proven commodity to take the team on.
They do not have that at the moment. But there are some options out there.
Steve Coppell, for example, could be the man.
The former Manchester United winger has a decent record of winning promotion with many of his clubs, and has an intimate, recent, and successful knowledge of the second tier of English football. He also knows how to take a club up and then keep them up—in 2007 his newly promoted Reading side finished eighth in the Premiership (a finish Newcastle have since failed to equal).
He has the pedigree for the task and, more importantly, is currently unemployed. Ashley would not have to step on any toes to get him. The only question is whether Coppell would desire the challenge of managing such a massive club—after all, in 1996 he left Manchester City after just 33 days, citing the pressure of expectations as a reason for his departure.
If the former England international shows interest in the job, Ashley should not hesitate in holding talks.
But if Coppell does not want the challenge, then there are other options.
Gordon Strachan, fresh from resignation at Celtic, might be persuaded to take the manager’s job if he can be given guarantees on transfer budgets and long-term ambitions. Of course, he might end up at arch-rivals (and Premiership survivors) Sunderland, instead. The lure of the Premiership might prove the decisive factor in the Scot’s decisions.
If that happens, it should be just the dose of realism the club’s directors and fans need.
The betting exchanges currently list Slaven Bilic, Avram Grant, Gerard Houllier, and Mark Hughes among the favourites for the job. Not one of them has Championship experience as a manager.
Coppell, Tony Mowbray, Alan Curbishley—all have experience of the Championship. Even Neil Warnock knows how to get a club out of the Championship. These should be the names given serious consideration.
Newcastle fans might not like the names mentioned above, believing them not to be worthy or glamorous enough for such a prestigious jobs, but that is exactly why so many fans at other Premiership clubs seem to have taken pleasure in their unfortunate plight.
Banners at Villa Park, from “Sob on the Tyne” to “Who Is You Next Messiah, Ant or Dec?” harshly mocked the devout followers of Newcastle United. Rightly or wrongly, this is down to the narrow-minded “holier than thou” attitude the Toon Army are perceived to have.
Thinking Alan Shearer is still the answer to their problems would only add further evidence to that perception.
If Newcastle want to get out of the Championship at the first time of asking, a man with Championship success on his CV needs to be in charge.
Mike Ashley needs to be strong enough to make such an appointment. Newcastle fans need to be realistic and humble enough to let him.
It would not be a criticism of Shearer.
It would simply be the best thing for the football clubCan you blame Alan Shearer?
Can you blame Joe Kinnear?
Can you blame Mike Ashley?
In the wake of Newcastle United’s devastating relegation on Sunday, fingers will be undoubtedly be pointed. Blame will have to be attributed.
As interim manager, Alan Shearer doesn’t believe one single individual is to blame. “Over 38 games, we all have not been good enough,” he said, in the wake of the club’s 1-0 defeat at Aston Villa.
But, having gained an average of 0.63 points per game from his eight games in charge (a statistic that would have amounted to 24 points over the full course of the season), he cannot—however much it might pain Newcastle fans—be absolved from all blame.
Mike Ashley, as chairman and bumbler-in-chief over the past season, will have to take the majority of the blame, and deservedly so. His mismanagement saw Kevin Keegan leave the club in acrimonious circumstances, and the difficult position that left him in forced his hand somewhat when it came to a replacement.
Joe Kinnear did well, if unspectacularly. But when he fell ill, the fat lady began singing.
Alan Shearer is a club legend—and deservedly so—but five points from eight games is simply not good enough. The challenge now is to take the club out of the Championship at the first time of asking, and that is a task that requires not just basic managerial skills—which Shearer clearly does not yet possess—but also specific motivational and tactical skills.
Most importantly, it requires experience.
Many players will leave, and many new players will have to come in. Does anyone really expect Shearer to be able to identify those players that a) are good enough to get play the club out of the Championship, and b) are willing to play in that league?
Shearer has not yet proven himself good enough for the Premiership, a league he has extremely intimate knowledge of. Having never played in the Championship, it would be ridiculous to suggest that he is the best man for the uphill task the club face.
Iain Dowie, Shearer’s assistant, may have earned promotion with Crystal Palace in 2004—but that was via the playoffs (where luck is the most valuable commodity) and with an inherited team already capable of such an effort.
Newcastle need a proven commodity to take the team on.
They do not have that at the moment. But there are some options out there.
Steve Coppell, for example, could be the man.
The former Manchester United winger has a decent record of winning promotion with many of his clubs, and has an intimate, recent, and successful knowledge of the second tier of English football. He also knows how to take a club up and then keep them up—in 2007 his newly promoted Reading side finished eighth in the Premiership (a finish Newcastle have since failed to equal).
He has the pedigree for the task and, more importantly, is currently unemployed. Ashley would not have to step on any toes to get him. The only question is whether Coppell would desire the challenge of managing such a massive club—after all, in 1996 he left Manchester City after just 33 days, citing the pressure of expectations as a reason for his departure.
If the former England international shows interest in the job, Ashley should not hesitate in holding talks.
But if Coppell does not want the challenge, then there are other options.
Gordon Strachan, fresh from resignation at Celtic, might be persuaded to take the manager’s job if he can be given guarantees on transfer budgets and long-term ambitions. Of course, he might end up at arch-rivals (and Premiership survivors) Sunderland, instead. The lure of the Premiership might prove the decisive factor in the Scot’s decisions.
If that happens, it should be just the dose of realism the club’s directors and fans need.
The betting exchanges currently list Slaven Bilic, Avram Grant, Gerard Houllier, and Mark Hughes among the favourites for the job. Not one of them has Championship experience as a manager.
Coppell, Tony Mowbray, Alan Curbishley—all have experience of the Championship. Even Neil Warnock knows how to get a club out of the Championship. These should be the names given serious consideration.
Newcastle fans might not like the names mentioned above, believing them not to be worthy or glamorous enough for such a prestigious jobs, but that is exactly why so many fans at other Premiership clubs seem to have taken pleasure in their unfortunate plight.
Banners at Villa Park, from “Sob on the Tyne” to “Who Is You Next Messiah, Ant or Dec?” harshly mocked the devout followers of Newcastle United. Rightly or wrongly, this is down to the narrow-minded “holier than thou” attitude the Toon Army are perceived to have.
Thinking Alan Shearer is still the answer to their problems would only add further evidence to that perception.
If Newcastle want to get out of the Championship at the first time of asking, a man with Championship success on his CV needs to be in charge.
Mike Ashley needs to be strong enough to make such an appointment. Newcastle fans need to be realistic and humble enough to let him.
It would not be a criticism of Shearer.
It would simply be the best thing for the football club.
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May 25, 2009 - Posted by | Sport, World Football | , ,

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